Fronteras: A Changing America

NPR Story
12:24 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

SDSU Starts Spanish-Language College Paper

San Diego State University's Daily Aztec newspaper will start producing a section in Spanish this semester.

Arturo Garcia, managing editor of the new venture, Mundo Azteca, said the idea was to reach the university's large Latino population in what, for many, is their native language.

Some 30 percent of undergraduates at SDSU are Latino.

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NPR Story
12:24 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Castros Join National Celebration Of MLK's 'Dream' Speech

As the nation celebrates the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I have a Dream" speech -- American Latinos are also reflecting on their struggle for civil rights and how King's dream is still alive for them.

As part of the day-long celebration on the National Mall on Wednesday, San Antonio Congressman Joaquin Castro will be taking the stage along with other civil rights leaders and President Barack Obama.

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NPR Story
2:23 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Riding La Bestia, The Immigration Train

Riding La Bestia, The Immigration Train
Fronteras Desk

EDITOR'S NOTE: Mexico has repeatedly accused the United States of mistreating Mexican immigrants - legal or otherwise. But immigration experts in Mexico say that accusation is hypocritical. They charge the treatment of Central American immigrants entering Mexico, almost always on their way to the U.S., is much worse.

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NPR Story
1:22 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Riding La Bestia, The Immigration Train

Riding La Bestia, The Immigration Train
Fronteras Desk

EDITOR'S NOTE: Mexico has repeatedly accused the United States of mistreating Mexican immigrants - legal or otherwise. But immigration experts in Mexico say that accusation is hypocritical. They charge the treatment of Central American immigrants entering Mexico, almost always on their way to the U.S., is much worse.

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NPR Story
11:28 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Immigration Reform Opponents Hope For Bill's Demise

Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 9:31 am

PHOENIX — On a recent evening, dozens of people file into the storefront of a Phoenix strip mall to attend a weekly meeting of the local Tea Party chapter. The guest speaker is Rusty Childress, a longtime activist against illegal immigration.

“Tonight we want to talk about the S. 744," Childress said. "It’s a monstrosity.”

S. 744 is the thousand-page-plus bipartisan immigration reform bill that is before the U.S. Senate.

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Border Surge Amendment Clears First Hurdle

Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 1:56 pm

A majority of U.S. Senators backed the border surge amendment added to the immigration bill in a vote late Monday. Approving the surge was essential to the immigration bill’s fate.

The procedural vote received nearly two-thirds of support from the Senators. It’s a small step but it means the border surge amendment now only has to clear a simple majority vote in the Senate.

Over the next ten years the plan will add about 20,000 new U.S. Border Patrol agents to the existing 21,000. It will also add new radar and surveillance systems.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Investigative Journalists Award Border Patrol Unhelpful, Closed Doored Accolade

The non-profit Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) announced that the U.S. Border Patrol was the winner of the organization's first annual Golden Padlock Award.

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NPR Story
10:04 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Immigration Compromise Not Satisfying Skeptics On Border

TUCSON, Ariz. — The U.S. Senate is expected to vote today on a surge of border enforcement that would virtually double the infrastructure and manpower already in place along the nation’s borders. Though along the U.S.-Mexico border, many say they are skeptical of the new plan.

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NPR Story
7:09 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Best Of The Border (6/16-6/21)

HUD Threatens To Take Back Navajo Housing Dollars

The Navajo Housing Authority receives about $80 million a year to build much-needed housing on the reservation. But there’s a huge backlog of $430 million unspent.

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NPR Story
4:29 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Hope For Immigration Bill With Injection Of Border Security

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 12:14 pm

The Senate announced a major compromise on immigration reform legislation this week involving a super-boost for border security.

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NPR Story
11:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

FCC Rules Choke Rural And Tribal Broadband Access

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — In order to expand broadband service to rural and tribal areas of the Southwest, the Federal Communications Commission will have to change it's rules. That's according to providers who say FCC regulations are doing more to hinder broadband deployment than expand it.

Small companies looking to provide broadband services to rural communities like the Mescalero Apache in New Mexico, and the Tohono O'odham in southern Arizona say FCC rules have hampered if not halted the expansion of broadband access in rural communities.

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NPR Story
10:56 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Agriculture Secretary Calls Defeat Of Farm Bill 'Unconscionable'

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — U.S. Department of Agriculture secretary, Tom Vilsack, calls the defeat of the Farm Bill in the House unconscionable.

The primary sparring point leading to the Farm Bill's failure in the House: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, known sometimes as SNAP, and other times, food stamps.

Republicans sought nearly $20-million dollars in reductions to SNAP programs while Democrats rejected those cuts.

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NPR Story
3:28 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Navajo Nation's Plan To Buy Coal Plant Put On Hold

Plans for the Navajo Nation to buy a coal mine in New Mexico from an Australian company have been put on hold, as negotiations between companies for a generating plant fed by the mine has raised questions about the future of Navajo controlled coal.

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Thu June 20, 2013

In Tijuana, A Breakfast Hall For The Stranded

TIJUANA, Mexico — Every morning, the dozen or so deportee shelters in downtown Tijuana are empty, as people make their way on foot to a bright yellow building on the outskirts of downtown — the Padre Chava breakfast hall.

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NPR Story
10:47 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Minutemen Co-Founder Charged With Child Molestation

One of the original creators of the Mexican border vigilante movement that set off so much debate a decade ago, was arrested on child molestation charges in Phoenix, Wednesday.

Police booked Chris Simcox, 52, into jail on two counts of child molestation, two counts of sexual conduct with a minor and one count of attempted molestation of a child.

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NPR Story
4:38 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

In Phoenix, Zombie Subdivisions Wake From Slumber

Fronteras Desk

PHOENIX — During the Great Recession, home builders in the suburbs abandoned neighborhoods that were only half built. The so-called zombie subdivisions left a ring of unfinished construction around cities like Phoenix.

But now the zombies are waking up as developers in the Southwest are scrambling to keep up with another frenzied demand for housing.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

Border Patrol Cutting Patrols To Save Fuel Costs

TUCSON, Ariz. — U.S. Border Patrol agents along parts of the Southwest border are being told to scale back operations in order to save on fuel costs. It's all part of the government sequestration cutbacks, and agents say it’s creating security issues in the field.

The memo from Border Patrol officials was quietly issued weeks ago in South Texas, agents say. They themselves weren’t even supposed to know about it.

The fuel rations affect agents in the Rio Grande Valley. Among the most controversial fuel saving ideas: carpools for agents in the field.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

Texas Governor Vetos Funding For Mexican-American Studies

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Texas Gov. Rick Perry is taking heat for his recent veto of funding for the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. The veto could end a plan to develop the center into a full-fledged academic department.

The Center for Mexican Americans Studies was set to be supported by a line item in the state budget until Perry crossed it out.

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NPR Story
4:43 pm
Tue June 18, 2013

Report: Immigration Reform Will Decrease Deficit By $900 Billion

The current immigration reform bill may reduce the federal budget deficit by roughly $900 billion over 20 years, according to a new Congressional Budget Office report on the economic benefits and cost of the Senate's bill.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Director Of ICE Resigns

John Morton, the Director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, is resigning.

Morton sent a letter to ICE employees informing them of his departure. Morton will leave at the end of July for a job at a private company. That company has not yet been identified.

In March, Morton testified to the House Judiciary Committee about his agency releasing 2,228 immigrants ahead of sequestration:

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NPR Story
10:22 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Supreme Court Rules Arizona Citizenship Proof Law Illegal

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that states cannot on their own require would-be voters to prove they are U.S. citizens before using a federal registration system designed to make signing up easier.

The justices voted 7-2 to throw out Arizona's voter-approved requirement that prospective voters document their U.S. citizenship in order to use a registration form produced under the federal "Motor Voter" voter registration law.

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NPR Story
7:04 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Brothers' Border Murder Brings Violence Into Focus

Fronteras Desk

In El Porvenir, Mexico across from Fort Hancock, Texas, drug cartel battles for control of the long-established smuggling route have triggered multiple killings on the Mexican side, most recently the murder of two brothers.

The violence rarely spills across the border, but the psychological impact does.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

New Mexico Seniors Not Getting Enough To Eat

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — One out of every five senior citizens in New Mexico isn't getting enough to eat, according to a report from the United Health Foundation. New Mexico ranks 49th in the nation for food insecurity.

The America's Health Ranking Senior Report looks at general health and food insecurity, among other issues facing the aging population.

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Thu June 13, 2013

New Mexico Town Offers Glimpse Of Life Without Water

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:12 pm

The vicious drought gripping the Southwest appears to have a bullseye on New Mexico. Wildfires are burning across the state and water is increasingly scarce. So scare, that early this month one town's well stopped delivering water completely.

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NPR Story
7:01 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Native Americans Receive Checks From Massive Class Action Settlement

Native Americans in the Southwest have received more than $96 million as a result of the nation's largest class action lawsuit against the federal government, and an additional $312 million is expected to be sent out this fall.

The money comes from a $3.4 billion settlement regarding the mismanagement of money owed to Native Americans during the last 126 years.

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NPR Story
7:01 am
Thu June 13, 2013

How Facelifts Could Fuel Nicaragua’s Economy

Fronteras Desk

SAN JUAN DEL SUR, Nicaragua — Nicaraguan powerbrokers want a foothold in the lucrative medical tourism industry.

After civil war destroyed the country’s economy in the 1980s, hospital administrators and influential businessmen now think the country is stable enough to lure foreign visitors looking for cheap surgeries.

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NPR Story
5:30 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Street Dealers Fuel Spike In Violence In Tijuana

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:56 am

More than 250 people have been killed in Tijuana so far in 2013. That’s a 25 percent increase compared to the same time span last year.

Between Monday and Tuesday of this week, local authorities registered seven homicides.

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NPR Story
12:53 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Immigration Bill Offers Few Changes To Border Patrol Use of Force

Photo courtesy of Jesus Rodriguez Fronteras Desk

NOGALES, Ariz. — The United States Senate is taking up the immigration bill this week amid demands from members of Congress to strengthen border security. But there are also calls for a re-evaluation of the U.S. Border Patrol’s use of force. Investigations into these cases are hidden from public view and can drag on for years.

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NPR Story
10:51 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Fate Of Voting Rights Act Weighs Heavily In Texas

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — There are several history-making decisions expected to be handed down from the United States Supreme Court in June. One could effectively wipe out the Voting Rights Act. In Texas, minority voters fear a possible loss of legal protection, while states' rights activists are eager for a change.

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