Arts/Life

The Salt
11:00 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Just What Your Summer Beer Needed, Frozen Foam

Kirin

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 11:05 am

Apparently, it is just what it looks like — frozen foam, on a beer.

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Author Interviews
10:53 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Why Flying Is No Fun (And May Be More Dangerous)

Michal Krakowiak iStockphoto.com

After the airline industry was deregulated in 1978, flying changed considerably.

Some of those changes have improved commercial flying, but others have made the skies much less friendly, says journalist and airline veteran William J. McGee.

McGee's new book, Attention All Passengers, details how airlines are cutting costs through regional carriers, outsourcing airline maintenance, mishandling baggage and overbooking airplanes.

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Remembrances
9:52 am
Wed June 27, 2012

A Laugh A Minute, On Screen And In Life

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 10:52 am

Nora Ephron, the essayist, novelist, screenwriter and film director, died Tuesday night in Manhattan. She was 71, and suffered from leukemia.

She's most widely known for films including Silkwood and When Harry Met Sally, which she wrote, and Sleepless in Seattle, You've Got Mail and Julie and Julia, which she wrote and directed. She also wrote many frank, humorous essays, some of which were collected in books.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed June 27, 2012

A Broken Family Navigates 'The World Without You'

Joshua Henkin opens his third novel with a dramatic setup. Leo Frankel has been killed while reporting from Iraq for Newsday. He was kidnapped and videotaped in a way reminiscent of how American journalist Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter, was killed in Pakistan in 2002. Over the past decade, dozens of newspeople have been killed each year in war zones, making this a timely subject for fiction. But Henkin places Leo's dramatic death offstage, telling it in sketchy snippets.

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Wed June 27, 2012

New In Paperback: June 25-July 1

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 8:22 am

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Amor Towles, George Pelecanos, Sapphire, Penn Jillette and Jane Gross.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
9:00 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

Ephron: From 'Silkwood' To 'Sally,' A Singular Voice

Author and screenwriter Nora Ephron died Tuesday in New York. She was 71.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 3:59 pm

Nora Ephron brought us two of the most indelible scenes in contemporary cinema — and they're startlingly different.

There's the infamous "Silkwood shower," from the 1983 movie, with Meryl Streep as a terrified worker at a nuclear power plant, being frantically scrubbed after exposure to radiation.

Then there's the scene in which Meg Ryan drives home a point to Billy Crystal at Katz's Deli, in 1989's When Harry Met Sally. You know — the one that ends with "I'll have what she's having."

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Movie Reviews
3:26 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

'Gypsy': Something's Rotten, This Time In Slovakia

Adam (Jan Mizigar, left) sits with his glue-sniffing brother, Marian (Martin Hangurbadzo). Adam tries to avoid a path of crime in Gypsy, but family regularly draws him into one.
In Film

Dad just died violently. Mom married the man who might be his killer. And now the dead man's ghost is appearing to his son.

That plot comes from Hamlet, of course, but Slovak director Martin Sulik's Gypsy is not otherwise Shakespearean. There are no soliloquies and little dialogue. The prince is 15 and inarticulate, and his Ophelia is entirely sane. She's about to be exiled from her community for the same reasons that nearly everyone else in this tale is victimized: poverty and prejudice.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

Post-Storm, A Fairy Tale And Reality Check In One

Quvenzhane Wallis, who was 6 at the time of production, plays Hushpuppy in Beasts of the Southern Wild, a fantastical tale about self-reliance and community after a storm in Louisiana.
Jess Pinkham Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 4:08 pm

Quvenzhane Wallis, the pint-sized African-American star of the wonderfully inventive film Beasts of the Southern Wild, was plucked from a Louisiana elementary school, and she's a find on many levels.

Six years old when the film was in production, Quvenzhane has a halo of wiry hair and enormous black eyes that flash fear and ferocity in quick succession. She's a mini-warrior in proudly flexed biceps and white rubber boots, and when, late in the film, well-wishers tog her up in a girlie dress and braids, she deflates, though not for long.

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Kitchen Window
2:51 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

The International Flavors Of All-American Coleslaw

Courtesy of Ben Fink

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 7:08 am

I encountered what's called "coleslaw" for the first time on the Fourth of July, at a picnic at the home of my graduate school professor. I had come to America from South India for school, and until then, I had no idea what "coleslaw" was.

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Summer Books 2012
5:32 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reading Romance Between (And Under) The Covers

Harriet Russell

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:13 pm

I grew up in a house full of poetry and the classics. Slim, gloomy volumes filled the bookshelves and piled up on the tables. My father, Robert Bly, recited anti-war poetry at the supper table; my mother, Carol Bly, preferred lugubrious Russian novelists and would counter with ethical advice gleaned from Turgenev.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Aretha, Einstein And Knowing 'Too Much'

Express Newspapers Getty Images

America is a nation of fans. And though you might not know it by whichever forgettable pop singers are currently shooting up the Top 40 chart, we're serious about our music. "You can dispute folks' politics or theology and still drink with them," as Anthony Heilbut writes in his entertaining new essay collection, The Fan Who Knew Too Much. "But [tell me], for example ... that Bob Dylan's music is 'worthless' and, well, you're on your own." This is true.

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Fine Art
1:02 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reflective Art Brings Light, Color To Historic Spaces

Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot's Red Bowl installation in Beauvais, France, recalls the way lepers once bathed in animal blood in an effort to cure themselves and avoid being ostracized to the one-time leprosarium where the installation is located.
Courtesy of Cao | Perrot Studio

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:03 am

This is a story about amazing beauty, imagination and magical effects — and it begins, ironically enough, at a one-time leprosarium, or hospital for lepers, in Beauvais, France, a small town outside Paris.

Lepers were sequestered in Beauvais in the 12th century. That history is now noted in an outdoor art installation made up of slim metal rods that curve up into the shape of a bowl. Each rod is tipped with a red, marble-sized glass ball.

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Books
1:01 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Four Books To Help You Master Chicago Politics

Southern Illinois University Press

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:08 am

The term "Chicago politics" gets bandied about whenever people complain about what they see as corruption and abuse of power.

Republicans often apply the concept to President Obama, who calls Chicago home. Earlier this year, presidential candidate Mitt Romney called one of the president's appointments "Chicago-style politics at its worst," and Illinois Republican Aaron Schock once described Obama's team as "the Chicago machine apparatus."

But what does that mean? And what are Chicago politics really like?

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Author Interviews
3:13 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

As The Earth Slows, This 'Miracle' Becomes Calamity

Emrah Turudu iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

Imagine waking up to find that Earth's rotation has slowed — inexplicably — and the 24-hour day now has 56 extra minutes. And imagine what happens if Earth turns more and more slowly — still for no reason — until days last as long as weeks.

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Remembrances
11:38 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Broadway's Richard Adler

Celebrated composer and lyricist Richard Adler has died at the age of 90.
Bob Gomel Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on Aug. 9, 1990.

In 1955, The New York Times called Richard Adler and his writing partner, Jerry Ross, "Broadway's hottest young composers." Together, they wrote the music and lyrics for The Pajama Game and Damn Yankees, two shows that became known for the songs "Hey There," "Steam Heat," "Hernando's Hideaway" and "Whatever Lola Wants."

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Movie Interviews
10:38 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Alec Baldwin: A 'Rock' Throughout The Ages

Club owner Dennis Dupree (Alec Baldwin, left) and his assistant Lonny Barnett (Russell Brand) try to figure out a way to keep their nightclub open in the movie adaptation of Rock of Ages.
David James David James

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:38 am

Alec Baldwin stars in two movies this summer — and they couldn't be more different.

In Woody Allen's To Rome with Love, Baldwin joins an ensemble cast including Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page, Roberto Benigni and Penelope Cruz as they romp around the Eternal City — running into trouble, weathering existential crises and falling in — and out — of love.

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Opinion
10:26 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Taboo Revival: Talking Private Parts In Public Places

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 6:35 am

Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air. His new book, Ascent of the A-Word, will be appearing this summer.

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Pop Culture
9:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Art Imitates Life In Same-Sex Superhero Wedding

It's wedding season for couples around the country, including superheroes. Marvel Comics, the group behind Spider-man, X-Men and the Avengers, recently released a comic featuring its first same-sex superhero wedding. Host Michel Martin discusses the intersection between the Marvel universe and politics with Marvel's editor-in-chief, Axel Alonso.

Monkey See
9:30 am
Mon June 25, 2012

The Official Monkey See GAFFE-B-GON Primer: Big Gay Mutant Wedding Edition

The cover art for "Astonishing X-Men #51."
Marvel

NOTE: Monday on NPR's Tell Me More, Michel Martin talks to Marvel editor-in-chief Alex Alonso about the wedding of Northstar and Kyle Jinadu. The audio will be available later today, and we'll add a link when it's up.

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You Must Read This
5:03 am
Mon June 25, 2012

In Old Havana, A Story Of Sunlight And Mystery

A vintage car on the streets of Cuba.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 7:47 am

Pablo Medina is the author of Cubop City Blues.

"Showtime! Senoras y senores. Ladies and Gentlemen. And a very good evening to you all, ladies and gentlemen. Muy buenas noches, damas y caballeros. Tropicana! The MOST fabulous nightclub in the world — el cabaret MAS fabuloso del mundo — presents — presenta — its latest show — su nuevo espectaculo ..."

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Ask Me Another
6:42 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

Peter Earnest: Spy Vs. Spy

Peter Earnest, ex-C.I.A intelligence guru turned head of the International Spy Museum.
Courtesy of the Intrnational Spy Museum

Originally published on Fri December 21, 2012 1:20 pm

Founding executive director of Washington D.C.'s Spy Museum, Peter Earnest joins host Ophira Eisenberg on this week's episode of Ask Me Another from the nation's capital. Earnest talks about how his experience as a former C.I.A. agent informed much of what you'll see when you visit the Spy Museum, including crytograms to uncypher and technologically-advanced gadgets to admire.

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Author Interviews
1:25 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

Dr. Karp On Parenting And The Science Of Sleep

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 12:33 pm

The key to being a new parent, says renowned pediatrician Dr. Harvey Karp, is to think of your newborn's "fourth trimester."

"Our babies aren't like horses. They can't run the first day of life," Karp says. "And so we need to recognize that they're evicted from the womb three months before they're ready for the world."

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Author Interviews
4:04 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Fight For The Right To Hear, 'Yes, Chef'

Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 11:50 am

As you walk in the doors of Red Rooster, you immediately see a key piece of design: a bar dominates the front room, nearly touching the street, as if to say to the people of Harlem, N.Y., "Come on in."

The story behind the restaurant's owner, celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson, is more about life than food.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Finding The Common Thread

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:31 am

On-Air Challenge: You are given three words starting with the letter "F." The answer is a word that can follow each of those three words to complete a familiar two-word phrase. For example, if given "flag, father's and field," the answer would be "day."

Last Week's Challenge From listener Kate MacDonald of Murphys, Calif.: Think of a common French word that everyone knows. Add a "V" to the beginning and an "E" at the end. The result will be the English-language equivalent of the French word. What is it?

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Television
2:25 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Norman Lear: 'Just Another Version Of You'

Norman Lear (center) created, developed and produced the hit show All in the Family, which ran from 1971 to 1979. The politically charged sitcom starred Jean Stapleton, Carroll O'Connor, Rob Reiner, Sally Struthers and Mike Evans.
CBS /Landov

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 3:42 pm

When legendary TV producer Norman Lear was young, his father gave him a do-it-yourself radio kit. Lear built it, turned it on and remembers one day hearing a fiery broadcast that spoke kindly of the Nazi movement and ranted against Jews.

"It scared the hell out of me," Lear, who is Jewish, tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz. "It was the first time that I learned that I was, quote, 'different.' I started to pay a lot more attention to people who were even more different."

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Monkey See
12:53 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Sorkin's 'Newsroom' Is No Place For Optimism

Jeff Daniels stars in HBO's new series, The Newsroom.
Melissa Moseley HBO

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 6:14 am

There is a moment in Aaron Sorkin's 1995 romance The American President in which Sydney (Annette Bening) asks her boyfriend Andrew (Michael Douglas), who happens to be President of the United States, the following question: "How do you have patience for people who claim to love America but clearly can't stand Americans?"

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2012
4:24 am
Sat June 23, 2012

Rich Reads: Historical Fiction Fit For A Queen

Harriet Russell

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 9:33 am

I have always loved a great story set in the past. Give me a high-powered historical plot, and I will keep turning those pages until my eyes cross. Kings or consuls, functionaries or janissaries, it doesn't matter, only that it pounds onward to the conclusion — volcano explosion, battle or market crash. It's literary dessert, and I devour every bite.

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Movies
4:23 am
Sat June 23, 2012

Shirley Clarke's 'Connection': Will It Click At Last?

In The Connection, Leach (Warren Finnerty, right) and his friends wait around for their heroin fix, which eventually comes courtesy of Cowboy (Carl Lee). The controversial film was shut down in New York after two screenings in 1962.
Milestone Film

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 9:07 am

Fifty years ago, a movie called The Connection opened in New York — then closed after two showings. Police shut down the theater and arrested the projectionist.

The movie is about drug addicts, and the language is sometimes frank — too frank for 1962 standards. The director was an independent pioneer named Shirley Clarke, whose movie has been restored and is back in theaters, soon to be followed by restorations of nearly all her work.

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Author Interviews
4:23 am
Sat June 23, 2012

Lessons For Europe From 'The Second World War'

STF AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 10:47 am

For most people, the start of World War II means German soldiers marching into Poland. Historian Antony Beevor begins and ends his new book, The Second World War with something different: the story of a German soldier who was actually Korean, was captured in Normandy, and wound up living in Illinois.

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Around the Nation
4:03 am
Sat June 23, 2012

On This Stage, Jesus Is A Robber; The Devil's A Rapist

David Sonnier Jr., from Jeanerette, La., plays the Devil in Angola Prison's production of The Life of Jesus Christ. He was convicted of aggravated rape and is serving a life sentence.
Deborah Luster for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 9:07 am

There are more than 5,300 inmates at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. Nearly 4,000 of them are serving life without parole. Last month, the Angola Prison Drama Club staged a play unlike any other in the prison's experience.

The Life of Jesus Christ featured 70 inmates, men and women acting together for the first time — in costume, with a real camel, performing for the general public. For the untrained actors, this production held special meaning as they saw pieces of their own lives revealed in the characters they played.

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