Arts/Life

The Two-Way
1:57 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

'Jonathan Livingston Seagull' Author Richard Bach Injured In Plane Crash

A file photo of author Richard Bach, in 1975.
Associated Press

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 2:02 pm

Pilot and author Richard Bach was hurt Friday when the small plane he was flying tangled in power lines as he attempted to land, according to media reports.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
1:17 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

The Movie Kristen Bell Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Michael Showalter, Christopher Meloni and A.D. Miles star in the 2001 comedy, Wet Hot American Summer.
Amy Rice The Kobal Collection/USA Films

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 4:37 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Theater
4:12 am
Sat September 1, 2012

George Takei Takes Story Of Internment To The Stage

George Takei rehearses a scene from Allegiance, a new musical inspired by Takei's childhood in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II.
Jeffrey Weiser Courtesy of The Old Globe

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 8:18 pm

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Author Interviews
4:12 am
Sat September 1, 2012

Kofi Annan On Syria, Hard Choices Of Peacekeeping

Kofi Annan
Sergey Bermeniev UN

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 1:31 pm

Kofi Annan has dedicated his life to seeking peace. The Nobel Peace Prize winner was the first career United Nations staffer to become secretary-general, after having been an assistant secretary-general for human resources, then for finance, and finally the head of Peacekeeping Operations, where he would be sorely tested by devastating wars in Somalia, Rwanda and Bosnia.

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'Weekend Edition's' Taste Of Summer
3:47 am
Sat September 1, 2012

Swimming And Snacking On Egypt's North Coast

Freska are small, sweet treats — thin, crispy wafers sandwiching patties of sesame, peanuts or coconut, often held together by honey or sugar.
Kimberly Adams

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 1:31 pm

In the summer, many middle- and upper-class Egyptians flee the sweltering heat and humidity of Cairo to a string of private beach communities that hug the Mediterranean coast. Here, the weather is cooler and the breeze off the sea carries the shouts of snack sellers. Those vendors make it possible for beachgoers to purchase snacks without leaving the shade of their umbrellas.

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Monkey See
8:54 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Dog Days And Classic Film Talk

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

When you can't beat the slowness of late summer as an entertainment season, you can at least embrace it, and that's what we did this week. Dog days of summer winding down, you say? We say it's time to talk about pop culture dogs. Not dogs in the "lousy product" sense, but dogs in the sense of literal, actual dogs. Faithful, friendly, silly, whether the size of an ottoman or the size of a wallet.

Among the little treasures, Stephen is fond of this slightly obscure dog — at least these eight minutes of him.

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Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
7:03 am
Fri August 31, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of August 30, 2012

Ivan Doig's The Bartender's Tale, about a single father facing his past, debuts at No. 13.

Author Interviews
1:24 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Against The Odds, A 'Miracle Boy Grows Up'

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Ben Mattlin has defied expectations for his entire life — starting with being alive at all. Mattlin has a condition called spinal muscular atrophy, and many infants born with it don't live past age 2. But Mattlin grew up to be one of the first students using a wheelchair to attend Harvard. He married, had a family and is now the author of a new memoir, Miracle Boy Grows Up: How the Disability Rights Revolution Saved My Sanity.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

'For A Good Time': More (Dirty) Talk, Less Action

Lauren (co-writer Lauren Anne Miller) and Katie (Ari Graynor) are reluctant roommates turned business partners in For a Good Time, Call ....
Ryder Sloane Focus Features

Hot topic du jour, discuss: Do women rule the world?

First the girls took over the schools, with their stellar grades and all. Then they got the lion's share of the jobs. (Not quite true, but the claim generates Web punditry by the ton.)

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

'Little Birds': Spiraling Down On Broken Wings

Wayward Lily (Juno Temple) falls for Jesse (Kyle Gallner), the head of a nihilistic skater gang from Los Angeles, in Little Birds, a story suffused with deprivation and despair.
Millennium Entertainment

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 8:46 am

The title of Elgin James' debut feature, Little Birds, refers to the two teenage girls at its center. But for all the sweetness and fragility that title suggests, one of those girls, Lily (Juno Temple), has a knack for destruction better suited to a charging rhino.

Lily, in fact, is the stuff of parents' worst nightmares about what their children might become as teenagers: sullen, willful, cruel, smart enough to know how to hurt those closest to her with a few well-chosen words but too dumb to know how to protect herself from harm.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

On A Gray 'Day,' One Last Post-Apocalyptic Stand

Trekking through a post-apocalyptic world in The Day, haggard survivors Adam (Shawn Ashmore), Mary (Ashley Bell), Shannon (Shannyn Sossamon), Rick (Dominic Monaghan) and Henson (Cory Hardrict) come upon a farmhouse that may provide much needed shelter and supplies — as well as hidden dangers.
Anchor Bay

In the post-apocalyptic film world, the tactic du jour for tipping off an audience that civilization and its inhabitants have all but kicked it seems to be simple color correction — specifically, zapping the frame of any lively hues and leaving behind a desolate palette of gray. Call it 50 shades of desaturated desperation.

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Movie Reviews
12:12 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

'Flying Swords': Fast, Furious And Now In 3-D

Yu Hua Tian (Chen Kun) and Chow Wai On (Jet Li) battle it out in Flying Swords, which translate's wuxia films' physics-defying action into 3-D.
CAO Kai Ping, Jupiter Wong, YIN Nan Indomina Releasing

A Tsui Hark movie in 3-D — not to mention the first wuxia film to be shot in the format — ought to serve up three times the spectacle of the usual Tsui affair. And damned if Flying Swords of Dragon Gate doesn't almost deliver.

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Book Reviews
6:26 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Haves And Have-Nots In 'NW' London

Zadie Smith is the author of White Teeth and On Beauty.
Dominique Nabokov Penguin Group

Some postal codes encapsulate a socioeconomic profile in tidy shorthand: 10021 for Manhattan's tony Upper East Side, NW6 and NW10 for London's racially mixed, resolutely ungentrified northwest quadrant. Zadie Smith's London birthplace — a major wellspring of her work — is the setting of NW, her ambitious though somewhat dilatory fourth novel, which tackles issues of fortune and failure, class and ethnicity, and the often guilt-inducing and sometimes blurry lines between them.

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Thu August 30, 2012

New In Paperback Aug. 27-Sept. 2

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Bernard Cornwell, Hisham Matar, Madeline Miller, Sally Jacobs and Jim Steinmeyer

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Destination Art
1:16 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Hannibal, Mo.: Art Abounds In Twain's Hometown

Twain's boyhood home in Hannibal, pictured circa 1955, is now a museum.
Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:56 am

Samuel Clemens, who is said to have taken his pen name Mark Twain from the cries of riverboat crewmen, found the inspiration for his classic works while growing up in the river town of Hannibal, Mo. Today, more than 125 years after the first pressing of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there's a new set of artistic characters in Twain's boyhood home.

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Author Interviews
12:08 pm
Wed August 29, 2012

A Linguist's Serious Take On 'The A-Word'

Linguist Geoffrey Nunberg says he wants people to take his new book, Ascent of the A-Word, seriously.
Nicole Katano

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 12:04 pm

Linguist Geoffrey Nunberg wants people to take his new book, Ascent of the A-Word, seriously.

"I'd meet people when I was working on the book, and even academics — they'd say, 'What are you working on?' and they'd giggle. Or they'd say, 'You must have a lot of time on your hands,' " Nunberg tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Author Interviews
10:40 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Victor LaValle On Mental Illness, Monsters And Survival

Victor LaValle is also the author of Slapboxing with Jesus, The Ecstatic and Big Machine.
E. Robateu Random House

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 11:58 am

In Victor LaValle's new novel, The Devil in Silver, a man is mistakenly committed to a mental hospital where a buffalo-headed monster stalks patients at night.

The plausibility of a monster roaming the hospital's halls made sense, says LaValle, who has a personal connection to the mentally ill.

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Wisdom Watch
10:03 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Brooklyn Mack, From Ball Player To Ballet Star

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, as we've kicked off our coverage of the Republican National Convention this week, we've asked a number of our guests what a successful country looks like to them. I'll explain why I'm asking that in my Can I Just Tell You essay. And that's coming up in a few minutes.

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Monkey See
10:03 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Entirely Real Photos: Model Or Headless Disney Mascot?

A model walks down the runway during the Maria Sofia Bahlner S/S 2013 Fashion Show from the Swedish School of Textiles during the Mercedes-Benz Stockholm Fashion Week.
Andreas Rentz Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 10:49 am

This is a model walking during a Maria Sofia Bahlner fashion show from what I am told is the "Swedish School Of Textiles," during Mercedes-Benz Stockholm Fashion Week.

This is undoubtedly an example of avant-garde design, fashion as art, exploration of textile possibilities ... I have no doubt, it is artistically driven.

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Monkey See
9:18 am
Wed August 29, 2012

The Eternal Leonard Maltin: The Movie Guide That Gives And Gives

Seen here in 2010, film critic Leonard Maltin has been dishing out his reviews in capsule form since 1969.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images for AFI

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 3:00 pm

When I was a kid, I awaited the annual publication of Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide with the awe and dread of a Parent/Teacher interview. Sure, film criticism is a subjective thing, but to my young eyes, the 16,000+ capsule reviews in Maltin's yearly reference book carried the weight of absolute truth. Each year, with the austerity of a poet and the precision of a diamond-cutter, Maltin and his army of cowriters pass swift, one-to-ten-paragraph judgment on hundreds of new films, and a small part of me will always believe the Guide is blessed with objectivity.

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Kitchen Window
5:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Zucchini You Actually Can't Resist

T. Susan Chang for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 9:56 am

"Ugh," my sister exclaimed one evening as we were making dinner. It was supposed to be an easy poached chicken with a ginger-scallion sauce, eaten with cold cucumber wedges, and we had just discovered that what we had bought at the store was not cucumber, but zucchini. It was an easy mistake to make — they were the precise same shade of green. But where the zucchini's skin was mostly smooth, the cucumber's was lumpy. We were not happy.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Martin Amis' 'State of England': Anomie In The U.K.

Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Too much is made of literature's ennobling qualities. There are those of us who come to books for the debasement and danger, for Hannibal and Humbert. For Faulkner's Popeye and Hedda Gabler. We want to meet the monsters.

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First Reads
4:03 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Exclusive First Read: Zadie Smith's 'NW'

Zadie Smith is the author of White Teeth and On Beauty, among other books." href="/post/exclusive-first-read-zadie-smiths-nw" class="noexit lightbox">
Zadie Smith is the author of White Teeth and On Beauty, among other books.
Dominique Nabokob

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 1:26 pm

  • Listen to this selection from 'NW'

The title of Zadie Smith's newest novel might be enigmatic for Americans. NW is short for northwest London — an area of particular racial and class diversity. It's the birthplace of the novel's two main characters, Leah Hanwell and Keisha Blake.

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Movie Reviews
3:09 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

For Bootlegger Brothers, A Twisty Path To Profit

Jack Bondurant (Shia LeBeouf) finds escape from the brutality of his family's bootlegging business in the company of the radiant Bertha (Mia Wasikowska).
Richard Foreman Jr., SMPSP The Weinstein Co.

John Hillcoat's Lawless opens with a scene in which two farm boys urge their younger brother to pull the trigger on a pig that's ready to be transformed into bacon. The boy, whose name is Jack, hesitates and then misfires; one of the older boys finishes the job, neatly and dispassionately.

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Movie Reviews
2:04 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

An 'Ambassador' Of Sorts, But Hardly Diplomatic

Mads Brugger, in character as diplomat Mads Cortzen, conferences with various members of the Central African Republic's government.
Drafthouse Films

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 2:42 pm

"If the Congo was the heart of darkness, this is the spleen."

That's how Danish guerrilla filmmaker Mads Brugger introduces the Central African Republic, the focus of his hidden-camera documentary The Ambassador.

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Author Interviews
12:34 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

'Real Romney' Authors Dissect His Latest Campaign

Michael Kranish (left) is the deputy chief of the Washington bureau of The Boston Globe. Scott Helman is a staff writer at The Globe. Both have covered politics, presidential campaigns and Congress.
courtesy of the authors

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 10:17 am

In The Real Romney, Boston Globe reporters Michael Kranish and Scott Helman examine Mitt Romney's political rise since 1994, when he ran for the U.S. Senate in Massachusetts. They explain how Romney shifted from supporting abortion rights to heavily courting social conservatives in the 2008 Republican primary.

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The Picture Show
11:51 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Drinking, Dancing, Dolly Parton: Photos Of The '70s Country Music Scene

Last Call, Tootsie's Orchid Lounge, Nashville, Tenn., 1974
Henry Horenstein

It may come as a surprise that the photographer who shot these country stars — and their fans — is from Massachusetts. But, Henry Horenstein explains, country music "was a rural music, not necessarily a Southern music."

As a young photographer, Horenstein spent a good part of the 1970s and early '80s at bluegrass festivals, Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, New England honky-tonks and elsewhere, documenting what he believed was an "era that was going to go away."

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Monkey See
10:12 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Nobody, Not Even Your Mom, Has Such Small Hands: 10 Other Products 'For Her'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Okay, so Bic has been taking a lot of flack for selling this pen "for her." (As it says on its web site, it is "a ball pen essentially for women," although that seems to invite a caveat, such as, "although there may be certain men to whom it appeals and we don't judge.")

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Monkey See
6:37 am
Tue August 28, 2012

YouTube Trends: Politics And Pop, Yes, But Education And Science, Too

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Broken Hearts And Dirty Minds In 'Fundamentals'

The first and most important thing you need to know about Jonathan Evison's heartbreaking, maddening novel The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving is that one of its two main characters is a paralyzed teenage boy, named Trevor. The other is a grown man, Ben, who frequently acts like a teenage boy. Your enjoyment of the book — the follow-up to Evison's well-regarded West of Here — will be largely predicated on how much you like listening in on can-you-top-this, gross-out sex talk, and ruefully self-demeaning descriptions of the female of the species.

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