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For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Election 2012
2:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Mitt Romney Makes His Case For Change

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. During his acceptance speech last night at the Republican convention, Mitt Romney told a story about his father. He said his father gave his mother a rose every day, and left it by the bed. She found out he had died on the day the rose did not appear.

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Election 2012
2:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Obama Asks Young Voters 'To Believe'

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

College students have been heading back to school, and so has President Obama. For the last two weeks, the president has been visiting campuses in swing states around the country. He's been urging students to register and vote. His campaign says it is also working to win the votes of young people who are not in school. Here's NPR's Scott Horsley.

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Middle East
1:25 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Relentless Attacks Send Syrians Fleeing For Relief

Syrians take refuge Thursday at the Bab Al-Salameh border crossing near the Syrian town of Azaz, in hopes of entering one of the refugee camps in Turkey.
Muhammed Muheisen AP

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Syria's president has vowed to crush the rebels by any means; his air force has not spared the towns and villages that support rebel brigades. In August, the death toll often topped 250 a day, according to Syrian activists. The fighting between troops loyal to President Bashar Assad and rebel forces has also sparked a refugee crisis for Syria's neighbors as thousands flee to the borders.

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Author Interviews
1:24 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Against The Odds, A 'Miracle Boy Grows Up'

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Ben Mattlin has defied expectations for his entire life — starting with being alive at all. Mattlin has a condition called spinal muscular atrophy, and many infants born with it don't live past age 2. But Mattlin grew up to be one of the first students using a wheelchair to attend Harvard. He married, had a family and is now the author of a new memoir, Miracle Boy Grows Up: How the Disability Rights Revolution Saved My Sanity.

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Middle East
1:24 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Israel Finds Itself A Partisan Election Issue In U.S.

Republican Mitt Romney greets audience members after delivering a speech in Jerusalem on July 29. Israel's new prominence in campaign rhetoric has some in the Jewish state worried.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 9:30 am

Although discussion of foreign policy was in scant evidence at the Republican National Convention, one country did loom large in the lineup: Israel.

Republican delegates in Tampa, Fla., were treated this week to images of Mitt Romney's recent visit to Israel. With stirring music and pictures of Jerusalem's iconic sites, the message of the Romney campaign is that the Republican candidate is a better friend to Israel than President Obama is.

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StoryCorps
10:47 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

A Veteran Cop Recalls A Tough Night On The Job

Mark Edens told his daughter Jessie about one night early in his career when he had to tell a woman her husband had died in a car accident. Edens was a police officer for 25 years. He told his story at StoryCorps in Atlanta.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

This holiday weekend, state troopers across the country will be stepping up their patrols. Much of their work will be routine traffic stops, but some calls they will respond to will be accidents, some of them tragic.

Retired police officer Mark Edens, 61, spent half of his career investigating fatal car accidents for the Michigan State Police.

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Around the Nation
5:32 am
Thu August 30, 2012

To Save Change-Making Time, Chipotle Rounds Bill Up

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:43 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Every so often, people talk of eliminating the penny - which isn't worth much anymore. It survives, but not in a Chipotle restaurant in New Jersey. The Star-Ledger says a customer discovered the restaurant rounding his bill to the nearest nickel, often collecting an extra cent.

Around the Nation
5:26 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Giant Tennis Racket, So Big It Needs A Permit

Ashrita Furman wants to build a tennis racket the size of a bus, and show it off at the U.S. Open. It's so big, he was told it's considered a building so he would need a permit.

Election 2012
5:00 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Romney Courts Vets At American Legion Convention

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, as Isaac moves north from Louisiana, it could affect other parts of the country, and we'll be following that story as it develops.

The other big story we have been following this week is the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida. Today is the final day, and it's an important one for GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney. He'll officially accept the nomination this evening. Yesterday, Romney took a break from the hubbub of the convention to do a little campaigning elsewhere. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on his getaway.

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Around the Nation
4:39 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Hurricane Isaac 'Fooled A lot Of People'

Marlaine Peachey works in the mayor's office in Mandeville, La. During severe weather she mans the office 24-7. She tells Steve Inskeep that Hurricane Issac was a water event they didn't expect.

Around the Nation
4:26 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Effects Of Issac Linger, Power Is Out For Many

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

It is the wind that defines the strength of a hurricane. The storm is not a hurricane at all until the wind reaches 74 miles per hour. Hurricane Isaac's sustained winds were not much beyond that, so it was a Category 1 storm, not two, three, four or five. But if the winds define a hurricane, it's the water that can do the most damage.

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Around the Nation
4:12 am
Thu August 30, 2012

New Orleans Imposes Dusk-To-Dawn Curfew

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Just to keep us up to date here on Hurricane Isaac, it's become a tropical storm and forecasters expect to downgrade it to a tropical depression by this evening. That is small comfort, though, to people facing the storm's strong winds and heavy rains. States as far north as Ohio could feel Isaac's effects.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Election 2012
4:03 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Ryan Tells GOP Delegates U.S. Needs A Turnaround

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:53 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

But now to Tampa, where this evening Mitt Romney will formally accept his party's nomination for president.

Last night, though, the stage belonged to vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan. In a campaign, it often falls to the running mate to be the attack dog and Ryan sounded up for the job. It was also a chance for the rising GOP star to defend his own ideas.

Here's NPR's national correspondent Mara Liasson.

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Business
3:56 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:44 am

The more than $3.5 billion deal was signed during a visit to China by German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Business
3:56 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Mortgage Settlement Overseer issues Report

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's follow up on another story. Earlier this year, five big banks settled the so-called robo-signing case, admitting they rushed the foreclosure processes for thousands of homeowners. Now, those banks are working to forgive and modify $20 billion worth of home loans.

As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, yesterday was the first chance to look at how banks are handling this part of the settlement.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Joseph Smith's first full report wasn't due until November, but he was eager to keep the issue top of mind.

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Election 2012
3:56 am
Thu August 30, 2012

The Making Of Paul Ryan

Republican Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan addressed the Republican National Convention last night. Steve Inskeep talks with Politico's Jonathan Martin about how Congressman Ryan became Mitt Romney's choice for vice president.

Election 2012
3:56 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Obama's Campaign Trips Blunt GOP Criticism From Tampa

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're getting a reminder here of how fiercely competitive this race is. Even as his party's convention is going on, Mitt Romney, campaigning in Indiana and President Obama, of course, not taking the week off - as rival candidates sometimes do during the opponent's convention. He's been making his case the last couple of days in college towns, trying to energize young voters.

And NPR's Scott Horsley is on the road with the president.

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Middle East
3:56 am
Thu August 30, 2012

United Nations Urged To Help Syrian Refugees

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Turkey's foreign minister is in New York today. He's urging the United Nations to begin sheltering and protecting refugees inside Syria. It's a move that would almost certainly require international military involvement to safeguard an area inside the country. But Syrian President Bashar al-Assad says talk of a safe zone inside his country is not practical. NPR's Peter Kenyon has this report from Istanbul.

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Planet Money
1:21 am
Thu August 30, 2012

What The Apollo Astronauts Did For Life Insurance

A astronaut cover signed by Neil Armstrong.
via collectspace.com

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 2:48 pm

This week, Americans have been remembering Neil Armstrong. But before he walked on the moon, he had to solve a much more prosaic problem.

"You're about to embark on a mission that's more dangerous than anything any human has ever done before," Robert Pearlman, a space historian and collector with collectspace.com, told me. "And you have a family that you're leaving behind on Earth, and there's a real chance you will not be returning."

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The Salt
1:19 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Subtracting Calories May Not Add Years To Life

A rhesus monkey eats watermelon, provided by zookeepers, at the Kamla Nehru Zoological Gardens in India in May 2012.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:34 am

Scientists have known for decades that lab rats and mice will live far longer than normal if they're fed a super-low-calorie diet, and that's led some people to eat a near-starvation diet in the hopes that it will extend the human life span, too.

But a new study in monkeys suggests they may be disappointed.

The long-awaited results of this study, which started back in 1987, show that rhesus monkeys fed a diet with 30 percent fewer calories than normal did not live unusually long lives.

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Sports
1:18 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Doing It To Win: Veterans Raise Bar At Paralympics

U.S. rowers Rob Jones and Oksana Masters train at the Rivanna Reservoir in Charlottesville, Va. The pair will compete in adaptive rowing at the London Paralympics this week. Jones, a former U.S. Marine, lost both legs to an improvised land mine in southern Afghanistan.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 9:22 am

On a placid summer morning last month, before the Virginia heat could hit them, a former U.S. Marine and his partner lifted their rowing scull into the glassy water of the Rivanna River, near Charlottesville.

"First thing I do is take these legs off," said Rob Jones, who like his rowing partner, Oksana Masters, is a double, above-the-knee amputee. They're the U.S. team for mixed-doubles rowing at the 2012 London Paralympics, which started Wednesday.

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Destination Art
1:16 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Hannibal, Mo.: Art Abounds In Twain's Hometown

Twain's boyhood home in Hannibal, pictured circa 1955, is now a museum.
Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:56 am

Samuel Clemens, who is said to have taken his pen name Mark Twain from the cries of riverboat crewmen, found the inspiration for his classic works while growing up in the river town of Hannibal, Mo. Today, more than 125 years after the first pressing of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there's a new set of artistic characters in Twain's boyhood home.

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Around the Nation
1:15 am
Thu August 30, 2012

In Drought, Should Corn Be Food Or Fuel?

Drought has taken a toll on corn this year, and as a result, a growing number of ethanol plants have closed.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:56 am

Standing outside the Central Minnesota Ethanol Co-Op in Little Falls, Minn., there's not a lot going on. The pungent smell of fermentation that typically hangs in the air here is absent. And trucks piled high with corn are nowhere to be seen.

They're idled in part because of high corn prices. And it's unclear when that will change.

"Most of the industry is just breaking even in terms of profitability or actually running at slightly negative margins," says Geoff Cooper, vice president of research and analysis at the Renewable Fuels Association.

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U.S.
10:08 am
Wed August 29, 2012

FEMA's Fugate On Isaac's Progress, Response

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

We've been hearing, all morning, reports of Hurricane Isaac coming ashore along the gulf coast, and we're going, now, to Craig Fugate. He is the FEMA Administrator, the Federal Emergency Management Agency - and he is spending the morning on the gulf coast. Mr. Fugate, where are you now?

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Around the Nation
7:13 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Flooding Strands Residents In Plaquemines Parish

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, Greg mentioned Plaquemines Parish. Look at a map of Louisiana and you'll see that parish, a finger of land sticking far out into the Gulf of Mexico. Jennifer Hale of WVUE Television is in the parish, spent the night there. And Ms. Hale, where are you now?

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Around the Nation
7:13 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Even At Category 1, Isacc Packs A Punch

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Hurricane Isaac made landfall last night in Louisiana and it is battering the Gulf Coast with high winds and a lot of rain. For the latest we turn to NPR's Greg Allen. He's in New Orleans and we have reached him by telephone. And Greg, give us a sense of this storm. It sounds like, you know, Category 1, which, you know, makes you not worry so much, but a lot of people fearing that it could just stay in one place for a good while.

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Around the Nation
6:36 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Missing Tourist In Iceland Finds Herself

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:35 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Larry Bird Looms Large Over Magic Johsnon

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Finally, Larry Bird looms larger than Magic Johnson. The two players fought a famous rivalry in the '80s. Bird's Celtics and Johnson's Lakers battled for NBA titles again and again. But one thing could never change. In the college championship game in 1979, Johnson's Michigan State beat Bird's Indiana State. Now, Indiana State plans a 15-foot tall statue of Larry Bird, larger than any existing statue of Magic Johnson. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Business
4:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with upping the oil output.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The group of seven most industrialized nations are urging oil producing countries to ramp up production. In a statement yesterday, the so-called G-7 nations warned of the risks, quote, "posed by elevated oil prices." Demand for gasoline usually starts to wane at the end of the summer but right now gasoline prices are hitting new highs. Oil prices are surging because of tensions with Iran and the ongoing concern about Hurricane Isaac.

Business
4:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is a home run for Major League Baseball.

ESPN agreed yesterday to pay the baseball association $5.6 billion over the next eight years for broadcast and digital rights to games. That is a record, we're told, for baseball broadcasting rights. It is also about double what ESPN currently pays to broadcast Major League Baseball games, although the sports network will be getting a lot more for its money this time around - more international rights, radio rights, rights to more games.

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