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Environment
9:07 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Telltale Rainbow Sheens Show Thousands Of Spills Across The Gulf

The 300,000 wells drilled in Louisiana are connected by tens of thousands of miles of pipelines that are vulnerable to leaks, like this one in a coastal marsh.
Gulf Restoration Network

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Jonathan Henderson of New Orleans-based Gulf Restoration Network is flying Louisiana's coast looking for oil. As usual, he's found some.

"I just noticed something out of the corner of my eye that looks like a sheen that had some form to it," he says. "We're going to go take a closer look and see if there's a rainbow sheen."

It's a target-rich environment for Henderson, because more than 54,000 wells were planted in and off this coast — part of the 300,000 wells in the state. They're connected by thousands of miles of pipelines, all vulnerable to leaks.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:03 am
Sat April 19, 2014

So This Is How They Do It! Zebras Getting Stripes

Ricardo Solis

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 10:42 am

How did it happen? How'd the zebra get its stripes?

In Rudyard Kipling's version, a gray, horsey-looking beast went into "a great forest 'sclusively full of trees and bushes and stripy, speckly, patchy-batchy shadows," stayed there awhile, and after a "long time"... got stripy.

OK. Not bad.

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Sports
8:09 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Top Teams Sitting Out Of NBA Playoffs

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

And it's time for sports. Today, the NBA playoffs begin, and several teams that normally steal the spotlight are nowhere in sight. Meanwhile, some old guys from San Antonio are again looking like contenders. We're joined by Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN The Magazine. He's at the studios of New England Public Radio. Good morning.

HOWARD BRYANT: Good morning, Wade. How are you?

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Ukraine Calls An Easter Truce In Clash With Militants

A masked guard holds a young boy at a barricade outside a building being held by pro-Russia forces in Donetsk, Ukraine.
Eleanor Beadsley NPR

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 5:03 pm

  • Despite Agreement, Standoff In Ukraine Appears Steadfast
This post was updated at 6 p.m. ET.

Citing progress in diplomacy and this weekend's Easter holiday, Ukrainian officials say they've suspended an "anti-terrorist operation" that is aimed at pro-Russian forces who have occupied government buildings in eastern Ukraine.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Captain Apologizes As Death Toll Rises In S. Korea Ferry Accident

A South Korean navy frogman dives into a water to search passengers believed to have been trapped in the sunken ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea, Saturday.
Lee Jin-man AP

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 7:02 pm

This post was updated at 7:25 p.m.

Divers recovered more bodies early Sunday in South Korea, from the wreckage of a ferry that sank earlier this week. The number of confirmed dead has now risen to 46. Since the ship sank on Wednesday, difficult conditions have complicated recovery efforts; heavy cranes have arrived that can shift the ferry, but officials say they'll wait to use them until they're sure none of the hundreds still missing managed to survive.

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Sports
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

NCAA Beats 'Strategic Retreat' On Food Rules For Student Athletes

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Wade Goodwyn. This week, the NCAA voted to allow colleges to provide their student athletes with as much food as they like. It may sound like a bizarre move, but what the NCAA allows athletes to eat on the college's dime is subject to its own set of rules. And they can sometimes border on the absurd. The move by the NCAA comes at a time when the organization is facing a bit of second-guessing about the way it's gone about its traditional role of policing college athletics.

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Bringing Poetry And High Culture To Sao Paulo's Periphery

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

Sao Paulo is one of the biggest cities in the world and one of the economic engines of South America. Its center is known for its fancy malls, posh departments and even helicopter landing pads. The outlying areas where the vast majority of the workforce live are known for poverty and crime, less often for poetry and high culture. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports on efforts to change that.

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Television
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Critics: Hollywood Tax Deals A 'House Of Cards' For Local Economies

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 8:12 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

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Code Switch
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

In Silicon Valley, Immigrants Toast Their Way To The Top

Engineer Mit Shah gives a speech at a meeting of the "ArtICCulators" Toastmasters Club in Milpitas, Calif.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 10:18 am

Public speaking can be nerve-wracking whatever your native tongue. It can be especially difficult for immigrants who speak English as a second language.

In California's Silicon Valley, some immigrant tech workers strengthen their voices by joining public speaking support groups like Toastmasters clubs.

Members usually meet once a week to practice giving speeches, which are timed to the second and judged for grammar and presentation. There's even a designated counter of ums and ahs.

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Asia
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Captain, 2 Crew Members Arrested In S. Korea Ferry Sinking

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Wade Goodwyn. Scott Simon is away. It's been four days since a ferry capsized off the coast of South Korea. Two hundred and seventy passengers are missing, most are high school students. After days of rough seas, divers have finally made it inside the submerged ship. NPR's Anthony Kuhn was with family members this morning and joins us now from the capital, Seoul. Good morning, Anthony.

ANTHONY KUHN, BYLINE: Hello there, Wade.

GOODWYN: Divers are inside the ship. What have they found?

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Asia
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Obama Adds Malaysia To His Asia Itinerary

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

For his second term, president Obama has touted that his administration would make a so-called Asia pivot - less focus on the Middle East, more on China. But history has a way of intervening. This week, the president will try to make something of his promise as he visits three U.S. allies - Japan, South Korea and the Philippines. He'll also be stopping in Malaysia, and he'll be the first U.S. president to do so in almost 50 years.

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Around the Nation
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Training Could Avert Another Fertilizer Plant Disaster

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

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Technology
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

If you've ever sat through a never-ending meeting or a bad movie, you've probably had to resist the urge to look down at your watch. What time is it? So imagine if you could just reach down and feel the time on your wrist. Well, when Hyungsoo Kim was in business school, he helped design a device that would let you do just that. It's not a watch, it's a timepiece 'cause you don't have to watch it to know the time.

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Europe
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Putin Tries To Sell Ukraine's Muslims On Russian Rule

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Russian President Putin is reaching out to Muslims in Crimea. Professor Robert Crews tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn that Putin is trying to build alliances in the Muslim world to weigh against the West.

Middle East
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Syrian Rebel Stronghold On The Verge Of Government Takeover

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

The Syrian city of Homs has been a rebel stronghold since the anti-government uprising began. But one rebel tells NPR that they're low on ammunition and medical gear.

Asia
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Avalanche Sweeps 12 Sherpas Off Mt. Everest

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Twelve sherpas died in a recent avalanche on Mount Everest. Climber Conrad Anker explains that the guides were helping prepare a route for hundreds of climbers expected for the coming summer season.

Africa
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Polio Threatens To Spread Through Central Africa

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

A polio outbreak in Cameroon has spread to Equatorial Guinea and threatens to move throughout Central Africa. Before the outbreak, Equatorial Guinea had been free of polio for nearly 15 years.

Author Interviews
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

How A Music Writer Learned Trust Is The Ultimate Backstage Pass

Lisa Robinson interviews a young Michael Jackson at his family's house in Encino, Calif., in October 1972.
Andrew Kent Courtesy of Riverhead Books

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Lisa Robinson has done just about every kind of music writing there is.

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Movie Reviews
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

'Say Anything,' Still Full Of Guileless Affection

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Twenty-five years ago, Lloyd Dobler raised a boombox over his head and changed the world of movie boyfriends forever.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IN YOUR EYES")

PETER GABRIEL: (Singing) All my instincts, they return.

GOODWYN: Linda Holmes of our pop culture blog "Monkey See" was a teenager when she first saw the film "Say Anything..." She says all these years later, she has a new appreciation of it.

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Shots - Health News
5:03 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Mental And Physical Toll Of Bullying Persists For Decades

The longitudinal British study checked in with 8,000 families across 40 years to trace the trajectory of a bullied child.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 4:56 pm

What doesn't kill us only makes us stronger, right? Well, not when it comes to bullying.

Some may still consider bullying a harmless part of growing up, but mounting evidence suggests that the adverse effects of being bullied aren't something kids can just shake off. The psychological and physical tolls, like anxiety and depression, can follow a person into early adulthood.

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Theater
3:20 am
Sat April 19, 2014

For Chris O'Dowd, 'Of Mice And Men' Is More Than An American Story

Of Mice and Men. Leighton Meester plays the wife of Curley, the son of Lennie's boss." href="/post/chris-odowd-mice-and-men-more-american-story" class="noexit lightbox">
"Any time you're playing someone with a cognitive disability of any kind it's dangerous territory," says Chris O'Dowd, of playing Lennie, in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. Leighton Meester plays the wife of Curley, the son of Lennie's boss.
Richard Phibbs Polk and Co.

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men — about George and Lennie, two laborers and unlikely friends during the Great Depression — may seem like a quintessentially American story. But Irish actor Chris O'Dowd, who plays Lennie in a new Broadway production the novella, says Steinbeck is "quite oddly" very popular in Ireland.

There's something about Of Mice and Men that appeals to the Irish people, O'Dowd tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn. "All of us have chased the American dream so there's something very universal about it," he says.

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All Tech Considered
3:08 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Tech Week: Earnings, A Heartbleed Arrest And Digital Distraction

Google and other tech companies reported earnings this week, amid fears of another tech bubble bursting.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

There was really only one tech story last week — the potentially disastrous Heartbleed bug. This week, we return to more of a panoply of tech-related news, starting with NPR stories in the ICYMI section, the broader topics in the industry in The Big Conversation and fun links you shouldn't miss in Curiosities.

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The Salt
3:07 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

Wal-Mart is promising to drive down the prices of organic food by bringing in a new company, WildOats, to deliver a whole range of additional products.
Wal-Mart/Flickr

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

It could be another milestone in organic food's evolution from crunchy to commercial: Wal-Mart, the king of mass retailing, is promising to "drive down organic food prices" with a new line of organic food products. The new products will be at least 25 percent cheaper than organic food that's on Wal-Mart's shelves right now.

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Parallels
5:13 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

A Journey Of Pain And Beauty: On Becoming Transgender In India

Abhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: "I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly."
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 10:44 am

The signs came early that Abhina Aher was different.

Born a boy biologically and given the male name Abhijit, Aher grew up in a middle-class neighborhood of Mumbai, India. The son of a single mother who nurtured a love of dance, Aher would watch enthralled as she performed.

"I used to love to wear the clothes that my mother used to wear — her jewelry, her makeup," Aher, now 37, recalls. "That is something which used to extremely fascinate me."

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This Week's Must Read
4:50 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

A Love Letter To Literature: Reading Gabo In 'The Paris Review'

Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in 1982, died Thursday at 87.
Paco Junquera Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

Everyone has a favorite Gabriel Garcia Marquez book, and mine is Love in the Time of Cholera. It's the story of a romance that lasts decades, unwinding through the pages of the book. It's verbose, vibrant and full of love.

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It's All Politics
4:31 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Are Democrats Trying To Energize The Base With The Race Card?

Attorney General Eric Holder (right) recently expressed outrage at the treatment President Obama and he have received from conservatives. He stopped just short of saying it was race-related, leaving that for the African-American audience at the recent National Action Network convention to decide.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:46 pm

Few mixtures in American life are more emotionally combustible than the one formed by the combination of politics and race.

That helps explain why Democrats, in general, and President Obama, in particular, have tended to steer clear of overtly raising race as an issue to explain some of the opposition to Obama's presidency and agenda.

There seems to be a shift in recent days, however.

Top Democratic party officials have either directly or indirectly blamed race for some of the hostility to Obama, his policies, or both.

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The Salt
3:53 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

In The Land Of Razor Clams, Dinner Hides Deep Within The Sand

Clams this fresh taste like tender calamari.
Martin Kaste/NPR

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

As soon as you drive into town, it's pretty clear that Long Beach, Wash., is all about the razor clam. The first clue is the giant frying pan. It's 14 feet tall and a relic of the clam festivals of the 1940s. And then there's the clam statue that spits when you insert a quarter.

But if you really want to see how much people here love their clams, you'd have to be like Karen Harrell and get up before dawn and drive out onto the blustery beach to go clam digging.

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Politics
3:48 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

In Virginia, Politicians Fish For Support At Old-Fashioned Event

Former Sen. George Allen (center) greets attendees at the 64th annual Wakefield Shad Planking in Wakefield, Va., in April 2012. This year's Shad Planking featured Democratic Sen. Mark Warner as the speaker.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

At a time when new technologies and social media are transforming politics, we turn to a decidedly old-fashioned campaign event. It's an annual festival known as the Shad Planking, a spring rite of Virginia politics for nearly 70 years.

It's a must-attend event for state politicians, who practice the oldest form of retail politicking among tall pine trees at a dusty campsite.

In Wakefield, about an hour southeast of Virginia's capital of Richmond, shad fish have been roasting by on an open fire since 5 a.m. They're nailed to oak planks.

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World
3:42 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Leaflets Given To Donetsk Jews Made Waves Worldwide, But Not In Donetsk

An anti-fascist sign hangs on the barricade outside an occupied government building in Donetsk.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

A development in Eastern Ukraine has set social media on fire and triggered outrage around the world.

In the city of Donetsk, someone distributed fliers ordering Jews to register with the separatists who have taken over government buildings.

Even though nobody in Ukraine believed the leaflet was real, the fliers hit a nerve.

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Africa
3:42 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Somalis In Kenya Are Used To Raids, But They Say This Was Different

Kenyan security officers rounded up people Friday as part of a crackdown that has swept up thousands of undocumented refugees, immigrants and Kenyan citizens of Somali descent in recent weeks.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 6:12 pm

Mohammed Ali Isaac's hands shook as he showed his Kenyan ID to the police officers. They let him pass, but his cousins weren't so lucky. The two women had forgotten their IDs at home, and the police were threatening to load them into one of three large trucks they'd brought for the purpose.

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